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Bebop Spoken There

More from Jazz Monthly:

John Postgate: "Oscar Peterson played a good solo in 1954..." - (Jazz Monthly August 1960)

Bill Evans: "A composer writes something, and an orchestra interprets it--he spends maybe six months writing 10 minutes of music, but a jazz musician spends 10 minutes of playing 10 minutes of music, and he performs it himself". - (Jazz Monthly July1960).

Archives

Today Saturday October 21

Afternoon

???????

Evening

Tees Valley Jazzmen - Sadberge Village Hall, 5 Beacon Grange Park, Sadberge, Darlington DL2 1TW. 7:30pm. £9.00. inc cheese & biscuits, BYOB.

Mat Maneri/Evan Parker/Lucian Ban: Sounding Tears - Sage Gateshead. 7:45pm. £13.50.

The Exiles - The Globe, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD. 8:00pm. £5.00. Line-up: Dave Hignett (trumpet), Niall Armstrong (tenor sax), Mike Cunningham (piano), Hazel Hanley (double bass) & Paul ‘Sid’ Wight (drums).

George Shovlin & the Radars - Billy Bootleggers, Nelson St, Newcastle NE1 5AN. 9:00pm.

To the best of our knowledge, details of the above events are correct but may be subject to alteration.

Thursday, April 30, 2015

International Jazz Day @ The Globe

Today is International Jazz Day and it's being celebrated in just about every civilised country in the world including, of course, the UK.
Needless to say, The Newcastle Jazz Coop are proud to be the only north east organisation to be participating and, as such, the only jazz venue in the area to be publicly recognising this day.
Tonight, at the Jazz Coop's home - the Globe Jazz Bar, 11 Railway St., Newcastle NE4 7AD the Jazz Coop show their support of the occasion by presenting the CUSTOMS HOUSE BIG BAND with top vocalist RUTH LAMBERT in the downstairs bar. Doors open at 7.15pm - admission £7.50.
Later, upstairs, there's a jam session starting circa 9.30pm with all musicians invited and it's free.
There's also a disco downstairs after the CHBB set is finished.
By coincidence, tonight is also the first anniversary of the Jazz Coop buying The Globe - setting up the UK's first music venue co-op - so there is plenty to celebrate!
Lance.

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Darlington Jazz Festival. April 26: A Festival Concert Finale @ St Augustine’s

(Review by Russell)
The festival’s now traditional closing event is programmed by Darlington Jazz Club. This year’s guests – the Simon Read Octet – have firm associations with the prestigious Leeds College of Music degree course. The west Yorkshire hot house has established a veritable conveyor belt of talented musicians. Bassist Simon Read leads a superb octet, playing his own compositions with a recently released CD – Times Leap – to tour. The assured Read has assembled a cracking outfit; trumpeter of the moment Laura Jurd, the brilliant altoist Ben Lowman, the equally brilliant Will Howard (tenor saxophone/clarinet), the nu-school guitarist Michael de Souza, the in demand Kevin Holbrough (trombone), pianist/lecturer Jamil Sheriff and ace drummer Sam Gardner.

Darlington Jazz Festival. Sunday April 26: An Afternoon Session @ St Augustine’s

(Review by Russell)
St Augustine’s Parish Centre, an established venue thanks to Darlington New Orleans Jazz Club’s monthly concert promotions, hosted the final day of this year’s Darlington Jazz Festival. Set in leafy grounds, a musician playing with his young daughter, doors open on a mild spring afternoon, the scene exemplified the festival organisers’ relaxed, welcoming approach.
Inside, preparations were almost complete. A festival banner being hung, similarly the   sponsors and Musicians’ Union’s pop up banners were put in place. Three bands were scheduled to perform. Darlington Big Band had the honour of kicking-off proceedings. Mostly old hands, ‘punctuality’ their middle name, the boys set up in good time, ready, keen to get started. 

JNE/Schmazz: We Free Kings @ Jazz Café - April 28

Toby Greenwood (ten); Simon Beddoe (flug); Kevin Holbrough (tmb); Jamil Sheriff (keys); Richard Hammond (bs); Dave Walsh (dms).
(Review by Lance/Photo courtesy of Ken Drew).
A musically faultless performance by this band from Leeds - do bands ever come from anywhere else but Leeds these days?  Admittedly they didn't hit the deck running - with an audience described by Paul Bream as discerning (AKA absent) -  a low key start was inevitable. However, a Wayne Shorter inspired original by one of the monarchs (Greenwood, his crown a snappy, narrow brimmed fedora) moved up through the gears and it was game on.

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Darlington Jazz Festival. April 25: The Late Night Festival Jam Session

(Review by Russell).
How many jazz musicians can you get into a Darlington telephone box? Following the Bruce Adams-Al Wood concert at the Dolphin Centre it appeared that most of those in the audience were keen to get along to the Quakerhouse pub to catch the late night jam session. The Camra award-winning pub isn’t the biggest hostelry in town and its loyal patrons regularly fill the place. A horde of jazz fans duly descended on the Mechanic’s Yard venue and stood at the door…

GIJF Photos by Ken Drew


Here are a selection of magnificent photos by Ken Drew, taken earlier this month, at this year's Gateshead International Jazz Festival. 
Well done Ken, you've captured the atmosphere on the Concourse perfectly.
Photos.

Monday, April 27, 2015

Darlington Jazz Festival. April 25: Bruce Adams & Al Wood with the Durham Alumni Big Band + Durham County Youth Big Band

(Review by Russell).
The Central Hall in the Dolphin Centre has been described as a palais de danse. Built on civic pride, ornate chandeliers illuminate the grand setting as concertgoers ascend the red carpeted staircase. Function suite tables dressed in linen table cloths, flowers decorating a candlelit scene. A posh ‘do’? Nothing of the sort, this was a big band session Darlington-style!
All seats (265 of them) were sold. The Durham County Youth Big Band opened the show with a Matt Roberts’ arrangement of Mercy! Mercy! Mercy! The young musicians on the stage won applause for each and every solo effort. An abundance of talented, enthusiastic musicians were heard in all sections of the band. A Sammy Nestico arrangement of Satin Doll held no fears and a rousing St Louis Blues got the audience going. The band played This Can’t Be Love a matter of three weeks after seeing the parts for the first time at one of its regular rehearsal nights. This public premiere on such an auspicious occasion could have fallen apart but the Durham County Youth Big Band rose to the task in fine style.

Splinter @ the Bridge present YANA - April 26

Corey Mwamba (vibes); Dave Kane (bass); Johnny Hunter (drums)
(Review by Steve/photos courtesy of Ken Drew)
Sunday nights in Newcastle will never be the same again. After 5 years showcasing the most interesting and stimulating jazz from far and wide, Splinter have had to call it a day. Although supported by a loyal hardcode audience, the overall numbers attending made the project simply unsustainable.

Darlington Jazz Festival. April 25: From Clervaux to the Quakerhouse

(Review by Russell)
Saturday morning. A pastry? A coffee? The Coniscliffe Road Clervaux Bakery with its sunlit covered courtyard provided the perfect platform to serve up an all-day jazz menu. Early birds (ten o’clock) enjoyed the piano playing of Steve McGarvie. On the hour, an ever changing roster of soloists or duos played for twenty minutes or so. The pairing of Dean Stockdale and Jonny Dunn worked well; piano dovetailing nicely with trumpet. A relaxed Misty encapsulating the day’s laidback approach. A rustle of a broadsheet, food orders brisk, quiet chatter, well-behaved tots. Chill. 

Sunday, April 26, 2015

Vieux Carré @ The Globe Jazz Bar, Newcastle.

Peter Wright (tpt); Paul Gowland (ten); Laurence McBriarty (tmb); Brian Bennett (bjo); Phil Rutherford (sousa); Fred Thompson (dms/vcl) + John Broddle and Minnie Frazer (vcls).
(Review by Lance).
The diversity of  music presented by the Jazz Coop at the Globe Jazz Bar has never been more clearly defined than by these last two sessions. Yesterday, the DB Jazz Project were looking towards tomorrow. Today, the Vieux Carré Jazzmen looked back at yesterday (and a few days before that!)
Both are relevant, Jazz has a long and beautiful past and it is important that that there are still bands around, such as the VCJ, to ensure that the bygone eras are not forgotten.

Peter Gilligan & Don Forbes @ The Jazz Café - April 25

Peter Gilligan (pno); Don Forbes (tpt).
(Review by Lance).
I made my way back to civilisation - if that's the correct term for Newcastle on a Saturday night - via Shanks' Pony and night-capped at the Jazz Café.
A bottle of Grainger Bitter went down well with the piano/trumpet combination of Gilligan,P and Forbes,D who were doing nice things with Iris - a piece by Shorter,W.
A customer requested something he could singalong to so they played St.Vitus Dance by Silver,H.
He didn't singalong and, fortunately, didn't dance either.
Break time coincided with the arrival of bon viveur and man about town Ray Burns who displays a similar flair for fashion to that associated with both Wilde,O and Melly,G. He'd been to a Gothic happening down Whitby way.
Back on the stand, Dear Old Stockholm and Tenderly saw the duo lay down flowing trumpet lines and fanciful piano flights. They sounded good but the Metro beckoned so it was with much reluctance that I left.
Lance.

DB Project @ The Globe - April 25.

DB Project: David Keighley (saxes); Thomas MacMillan (gtr); Adrian Sander (bs gtr); Ben Grant (dms)
(Review by Lance).
With Russell, our roving reporter, covering the goings on down in deepest Darlo it was up to me to take stock of city centre happenings in Newcastle.
The "Toon" was buzzing. Hens were partying and, despite a seventh consecutive defeat, "The shirts" were smiling - possibly because Sunderland were now in the relegation zone. The 22 bus from Stand F was only 8 minutes late so I reached The Globe Jazz Bar just as the DB Project were firing up the nuclear reactors that power their sound system. You need decibels? DBP have them to spare!
Within the constraints of the compact Jazz Bar the sound was overwhelming - this was World War 23 set to music!

Saturday, April 25, 2015

Darlington Jazz Festival. April 24: Matt Roberts Sextet plays the music of Fats Navarro

Matt Roberts (trumpet), Matt Anderson (tenor saxophone), Ben Lowman (alto saxophone), Sam Watts (keyboards), Angus Milne (double bass) & Sam Gardner (drums).
(Review by Russell).
In preview Bebop Spoken Here advised early arrival. Minutes before the start of this gig in the upstairs room at the Voodoo Café it was standing room only. All seats taken, walls lined with dozens of people, some relegated to a spot in the corridor, numbers exceeding expectations.
An air of anticipation, a ‘buzz’ in the air. Returning local hero Matt Roberts was to play the music of Fats Navarro. At a guess, his sextet’s average age would be little more than thirty, if that. And what a sextet! Familiar faces, some less so, six superb jazz musicians. 

CD Review: London Afrobeat Collective - Food Chain

Funke Adeleke (vcl); Alex Farrell, Alex Szyjanowicz (gtr); Andy Watts (tpt); Edmund Swinburn (ten); Klibens Michelet (bar); Lee Crisp (cong); Zak Cohen (perc); John Mathews (bs); Farivar Gorjian (dms).
(Review by Lance).
Living the cloistered life that I do, Afrobeat, as a genre, hasn't clicked on my awareness gene, until now - not much call for that sort of stuff down 'wor street'.
Which is more the pity as it's great music to boogie to - I'm sure that if I played this on a summer's evening at full blast and opened the living room windows, the neighbours would be out in force either dancing on the Green or telling me where to go and it wouldn't be to Africa!

Friday, April 24, 2015

CD Review: Fulvio Sigurta - The Oldest Living Thing

Fulvio Sigurta (tpt/flug); Steve Swallow (el. bs); Federico Casagrande (gtr).
(Review by Lance).
If your jazz persuasion runs along the "Wham, Bang, Thank You, Ma'am" lines then this album is not for you.
However, if you've found a space in your heart for the lyricism of Chet, Miles, or/and Chris Botti then they'll have to move over to make space for Italian horn man Sigurta.

Ella El-Salahi @ King’s Hall. April 23

(Review by Russell).
Final year music student Ella El-Salahi sang at this week’s Thursday afternoon student performances session in King’s Hall, Newcastle University. The Newcastle University Jazz Orchestra vocalist performed two numbers – Angel Eyes and Omar’s The Man. On the first tune El-Salahi worked in the company of tenor saxophonist Faye MacCalman (herself a final year undergraduate). Expressive in voice, rich timbres, confident.

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Rendezvous @ The Monkseaton Arms

Maureen Hall and the boys have moved along the road (Front Street) from the Black Horse to the Monkseaton Arms. At short notice, Rendezvous Jazz upped sticks to the Monkseaton Arms (a roadhouse pub with its own jazz history) to maintain a weekly lunchtime session at the coast. As usual it’s a one o’clock start, admission free. 
Russell.

I’ll Tick That Jazz Beer (Hic!)

(Ramblings by Russell).
Last week’s annual Newcastle Beer and Cider Festival (the 39th!) was, as ever, a winner. Hundreds of beers to sup, thousands of beer drinkers doing exactly that. A silly hat event, a chill-out lounge, live music and…beer, beer and more beer.
Gentleman’s Nectar (4.2%) the first to be ‘ticked-off’. Brewed by Box Social Brewing in Newburn, the hoppy ‘West Coast’ pale beer comes from the same micro that has brewed Smoove and Turrell Transatlantic Pale Ale (4.2%). S & T and the boys visited the brew- house to sample the trial batch and gave it their seal of approval. The beer will be on sale at the Gateshead Beer Festival (May 1 – 3) and to mark the occasion Smoove and Turrell will be gigging at the event!

The Secret Gig of Riley @ The Lit & Phil. Monday April 27

(Preview/Investigation by Russell of the Yard)
The first Newcastle Noir takes place on Saturday 2nd and Sunday 3rd May at the Lit & Phil on Westgate Road in Newcastle. Talks, tours and workshops will explore the multi-faceted crime writing genre. From page to screen, gangsters and gangs, the world of the legal eagle, it’s all there for the committed fan. There is, however, a mystery in the form of a ‘who dunnit?’ or rather a ‘who didn’t do it?’ that will forever remain unsolved.

Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Jammin' @ The Caff - Jazz Café, Newcastle April 21.

Peter Gilligan (pno); Paul Grainger (bs); Bradley Johnston (gtr); Paul Wight (dms) + Joel Brown (pno); Stuart Finden (ten); Joe Fowler (tmb); Fiona Finden (vcl/sop); Rob Bates (dms); Joel's dad (bs); Tom Lapworth (gtr); Alexis Cairns (ten); Eric Stutt (dms); Tony Rose (bar); Yuya Honami (dms); Paul Gowland (alt); Ian Forbes (dms); Luke Stuart-Smith (bs); Fabio ? (gtr); Alec J.Gamble (cor) - there may have been more.
(Review by Lance).

Be There! Folk Meets Jazz@The Globe Thursday May 7

To quote a television comedy programme of yesteryear, ‘I shall say this only once’, at least for now anyway. 
The Folk Meets Jazz session in March was a great success, so it is being repeated on the first Thursday of every month, so the next one is Thursday May 7 at 8pm.  For instance, I hope Peter Ninnim comes again, as he was a great hit (oh dear, a pun) on drums for both folk and jazz.
Free Admission. Be there!

Ann Alex

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

VCJ @ The Globe this Sunday (April 26)

Hello everyone! 
Hope you can join us this Sunday (26 April) at the JazzCoop@The Globe for a Trad Night with the VCJ. The jazzmen go back to their roots playing at The Globe pub which is a 'stone's throw' from the old New Orleans Jazz Club behind the Central Station - a terrific night of trad nostalgia is assured. Doors 7.00pm. Showtime 7.30pm. Entry £5. 
Brian Bennett
(Bandleader and Banjoist.)

CD Review: Andrew DiRuzza - Shapes and Analogies.

Andrew DiRuzza (gtr/comp); Robert Espe (ten); Michael Jarvey (keys); Blake Shaw (bs); Marcelo Cardoso (dms).
(Review by Lance).
Jazz is an ever evolving art form and, whilst I don't always go along with some of the directions it takes, there are those who press onward and upward without losing the plot. Shapes and Analogies is just such an example. DiRuzza states that his objective was to to produce a refreshing, yet familiar sound, reminiscent of past and present influences in jazz.

Monday, April 20, 2015

Edinburgh Jazz and Blues Festival - 40 Exciting Artists Announced

The first news re Edinburgh Jazz and Blues Festival were announced yesterday.
Details.
Lance.

A New Band Hits Town! The Gala Theatre Big Band Gala - Theatre, Durham April 19.

(Review by Jerry)
The availability of bottled Double Maxim (my preferred match-day tipple) made this feel like a visit to the Stadium of Light – but without the pain! Here there were only winners: Durham City with a new big band; Paul Edis, the band-leader; the band as a whole who gave such an excellent debut concert; the many soloists who bravely conquered first-night nerves and, above all, the audience (150-200, I guess) who lapped it up from start (Miller’s In the Mood) to finish (Basie’s One o’Clock Jump)! And there were some brilliant hats and waistcoats too!

CD Review: Elina Duni Quartet - Dallendyshe (Swallow)

Elina Duni (voice); Colin Vallon (piano); Patrice Moret (bass); Norbert Pfammatter (drums)
(Review by Ann Alex)
This CD is a wonderful example of a successful marrying of jazz and folk music.  It is my CD of the Month for April, even though all the singing is in Eastern European languages such as Albanian.  We reviewers here at BSH get to keep CD’s that we review, but I sometimes have to return mine to Lance for lack of space.  However, there’s no way he’s getting his paws on this one!

Bradley Johnston Quartet @ The Bridge Hotel - April 19

Bradley Johnston (gtr); Peter Gilligan (pno); Paul Grainger (bs); Tim Johnston (dms).
(Review by Lance/photos courtesy of Ken Drew).
The penultimate gig in the long-running Splinter Sunday night sessions at the Bridge Hotel, Newcastle was tinged with the sad knowledge that, after next week, they will be no more. 
Tirelessly organised by Andy Champion and Zoe Gilby the concerts showcased a countless number of bands and musicians from across the region and further afield - sometimes in conjunction with JNE.
Thank you both for some memorable evenings.

Sunday, April 19, 2015

Get on the Mainline to Darlington Jazz Festival

(Preview by Russell).
The fourth annual Darlington Jazz Festival returns this week (Thursday 23-Sunday 26 April) with a new look and a fantastic line-up! The festival launches the borough-wide Darlington Arts Festival running throughout May. Jazz fans will be spoilt for choice at various venues across the town centre. Concerts, jam sessions, street performances – it makes for a busy, memorable long weekend.
The Jazz Festival kicks-off with a workshop on Thursday evening at Crown Street Art Gallery and Library. Star trumpeter and jazz educator Matt Roberts returns to his home town to lead the event beginning at six o’clock. All abilities are encouraged to attend (Roberts will engage with everyone, rested assured) and at £6.00. it may well be the best six quid you’ll ever spend. Places are limited (Roberts’ popularity guarantees a large uptake), to check availability visit: www.darlingtonjazzfestival@live.com.

Jazz Co-op @ The Globe: Havana Club 5 - April 18

Alan Law (keys); Antonio Morerro (vocals, shakers); Darren Millett (guitar) Paul Grainger (bass);
Carlos Rivera (hand drums, snares); Paco Rivera (hand drums, percussion)
(Review by Ann Alex/photo courtesy of Debra).
If you’re up for a good time, partying, dancing, this band is definitely the band for you. I enjoyed hearing them so much that I’m thinking of taking up cigar-smoking, to make the image complete!  They started as they meant to go on, with a long vamp of South American sounds, piano and guitar riffs, drums, cymbals, bird whistles, shouts, snatches of song in Spanish/Portuguese (?), the singer encouraging us to join in, ‘Party, party, si senor’, all climaxing in a general mash-up. Many bands would have opted for something quiet after all that excitement, but no, we had more lively sounds, then the flowing piano comes to the fore: - this review stops for a while as I’m up dancing with Debra, Helen, Jen and Mary, can’t resist, blame the music!

CD Review: JazzMain - A Sound for Sore Ears

Nick Gould (ten); Steve Grossart (keys); Jennifer Clark/Owen MacDonald (bs); Kevin Dorrian (dms).
(Review by Lance).
Since the fortnightly Tuesday night jam sessions began at the Jazz Café there have been many sitters-in welcomed and none more so than Edinburgh's Nick Gould who occasionally pops down for a jam.
Well, come June 19, Nick will be playing the upper room of The Caff as part of JazzMain and, on the strength of this CD, it is going to be a night to savour for those of us who like what was called Modern Jazz before it became known as contemporary.

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Paul Skerritt Band @ The Jazz Café - April 17.


Paul Skerritt (vcl); James Harrison (pno); Anth Ord (bs gtr); Tom Chapman (dms).
(Review by Lance).
A Skerritt gig is never 'ordinary' - it's a 'happening'! To be more precise it's an occasion when anything can happen and invariably does - as our photo shows!
Entertainment is the name of the game with these guys and they provide it without loss of musical integrity (whatever that is!)
Put simply, they enjoy what they're doing and that enjoyment, being infectious, rubs off on the audience who willingly go along for the riotous ride.

Friday, April 17, 2015

CD Review: Helen Tzatzimakis - Soulfully

Helen Tzatzimakis (voice); Stelios Chatzikaleas (trumpet); Manos Athanasiadis (piano, arrangements); Antonis Arvanitis (bass)
(Review by Ann Alex).
Ms Tzatzimakis is currently studying for a doctorate in Modern Greek Literature and she is a linguist and poet.  She has won prizes for her singing and her voice has an extensive range with many tonal colours, sweet, pleasantly nasal, deep, or light and gentle. 

Phil Hudson Quintet w. Laura Adams @ Hoochie Coochie - April 17.

Phil Hudson (gtr); Graham Brown (organ); Paul James (bs); Gary Cowey (keys); Steve Wall (dms) + Laura Adams (vcl).
(Review by Lance).
Some gigs hit you in the face, full on, in the first number. Others start kind of meandering-like before moving up a gear. The former may grab you but, after that initial impact there's no place left to go whereas in the latter scenario, the tension builds and, before you know it, they too are flying and the only way is up!
Tonight was, by and large, in the latter category.

Thursday, April 16, 2015

CD Review: Eyal Vilner Big band - Almost Sunrise

(Review by Lance).
The Swing/Big Band era may no longer be with us but it is far from dead. I guess just about every major city in the jazz orientated world has it's fair quota of musicians who rehearse diligently in pubs and clubs, emerging every so often, to remind the public how it was, how it is and how it will be as long as there are people around who appreciate a well scored orchestration performed by persons (I almost said 'guys'!) capable of reading and blowing exciting solos. 

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

CD Review: Andy Sheppard Quartet – Surrounded by Sea

Andy Sheppard – tenor and soprano saxophones; Eivind Aarset – guitar, electronics; Michel Benita – double bass; Sebastian Rochford – drums.
(Review by Hugh)
This is Andy Sheppard's third album released on ECM.  The quartet is formed by the addition of Norwegian guitarist Eivind Aarset to the personnel comprising Trio Libero - whose output is encapsulated on the previous ECM release by Sheppard, which takes the name of the trio as its title.  The trio started out as an improvising trio, but in the new quartet format Sheppard wanted to “move things in a new direction with the addition of harmony and subtle grooves”.

CD Review: Alexander Hawkins Trio - Alexander Hawkins Trio

Alexander Hawkins (piano), Neil Charles (double bass) & Tom Skinner (drums & percussion)
(Review by Russell)
Alexander Hawkins is one of the most impressive pianists of his generation. Forging a path as an improvising musician, his love of the jazz tradition marks him out as one to watch in the coming years. Working with Anthony Braxton and Louis Moholo-Moholo has won him an international profile in the field of improvisation but it is his clear and genuine love and respect for the tradition that is refreshing in an improv world all too often reluctant to acknowledge past masters.

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Charles Gordon/Ken Hewitt Duo @ Vermont Hotel.

Charles Gordon (pno); Ken Hewitt (ten/sop).
More an open rehearsal than a gig, Charles and Ken laid down some smooth jazz on the off chance that the residents could be seduced from their three courses to hear some music that wasn't too demanding and very easy on the ear.
Don't get me wrong, in the right setting such as The Globe or The Jazz Café on a Saturday night, these two guys could burn the place down - give them bass and drums and the fire brigade would be on standby! 
The Vermont doesn't have that kind of musical insurance so, instead, it contented me to have a pint of Wylam's Angel Bitter and listen to some good sax grooves and tasty keyboarding.
But catch these guys when the chips are down and it's 'frying tonight'!
Lance. 
Charles Gordon/Ken Hewitt Duo are at the Vermont Hotel every Tuesday (circa 9pm).

Durham University Big Band News

The Durham University Big Band are now doing wedding gigs - if you don't believe me - Ask Andy Murray!
Our fly on the wall tells me that DUBB did indeed jazz up Andy and Kim's reception!
They're also available for Bar Mitzvahs and gigs at a jazz club near you.
And, who knows, Wimbledon Jazz Club in June - the ball's in your court Andy!
Lance.

Monday, April 13, 2015

GIJF DayThree: Loose Tubes + Andy Sheppard & Rita Marcotulli

(Review by Russell)
The last day of the Gateshead International Jazz Festival, the final concert in Hall One at Sage Gateshead, featured the reformed twenty one piece big band Loose Tubes. Festival Director Ros Rigby introduced the band and in so doing asked of the audience: Who had heard the band previously? Many in the hall had indeed heard the band first time around – some thirty years ago. Those who hadn't were in for a new experience.

GIJF Day Two: Double Bill: Zoe Gilby and Alice Zawadzki













Zoe Gilby (vocals); Paul Edis (keys); Andy Champion (bass); Adrian Tilbrook (drums). 
(Review by Ann Alex/photos courtesy of Ken Drew).
This was Zoe’s Pannonica set, interpretations of Thelonious Monk tunes, with words by such as Carmen McRae.  Pannonica was a baroness who was rumoured to be Monk’s lover, and could be considered to be the muse of bebop. Intriguing stuff so far, and the whole set was full of catchy, witty singing, interesting chat about the music, and well matched skilled musicianship. A suitable tribute to Monk, beginning with Rhythm-a-ning  and including Monk’s Dream (from 1963) with great piano and bass solos; Little Rooty Tooty (Zoe ended this on a fine high note which would have done an opera singer proud); Think Of One (lots of scat); and the well known Blue Monk, which sounded like a manifesto from Monk ‘trial and error, keeping on from year to year’, sung to a slow slinkyish tune.  Other tunes included were a piece with lyrics by Hendricks, and Reflections. All delivered impeccably, and it’s difficult to say something which hasn’t been said before about these fine musicians.

GIJF: Day Three - Davina & the Vagabonds

Davina Sowers (vcl/pno/uke); Dan Eikmeier (tpt/vcl); Ben Link (tmb/vcl); Greg Beyers (bs); Connor McRae Hammergren (dms).
(Review by Lance).
After the afternoon concert by The Cookers I thought nothing could match that session.
I was wrong!
Enter Davina and her Vagabonds.
Tiers two and three were full and the audience seated. However, at sea level it was standing room only to make space for those inclined to dance of which there were many.
The dress code was Retro so I blended in without trying - my old demob suit never lets me down on these occasions.

GIJF Day Three: Vocal Workshop with Alice Zawadzki and Other Matters

(Review by Ann Alex/photo courtesy of Ken Drew)
At last I know where my soft palate is situated.  We began the workshop with vocal exercises, hums so that we could feel our soft palates enhancing the sound, then we found our diaphragms for breathing exercises.  We then sang ‘ooo’ on our chosen note, sounding rather like Buddhist monks, quite spiritual, and the sounds tend to come together to form a pleasing whole, surely a sign that human beings have a natural tendency to co-operate, at least that’s my interpretation of it. Then brave volunteers sang solo to the accompaniment of Alice’s fine band of keys, guitar, bass and drums (named on the review of Saturday evening).

GIJF Day Three - The Cookers!

Billy Harper (ten); Eddie Henderson, David Weiss (tpt); Jaleel Shaw (alt); George Cables (pno); Cecil McBee (bs); Billy Hart (dms).
(Review by Lance).
Even before Saturday's Living Legacy talk with the musicians I knew this would be something special but after hearing the guys talking about the music, my anticipation was even higher. I wasn't disappointed!
This was something else!
The ensemble sound a joy to behold and the solos wild and wonderful. These guys are competitive - The OK Coral with a jazz score!

GIJF Day Three: A couple of Duos on The Concourse

Dean Stockdale (pno); Neil Harland (bs).
(Review by Lance/photos courtesy of Ken Drew).
I'd just had my mind blown by "The Cookers" and this was the ideal balm to bring me, if not down to Earth, at least within safe landing distance. I only caught the last three tunes that Dean and Neil laid down but it was enough to reveal what a class act these two are - Triste, Funky Mama and Oh Lady be Good. Catch Dean & Neil, along with James Birkett & Paul Smith at the Black Bull, Blaydon next Sunday evening April 19, 8.pm).

GIJF Day Two: The Jazz Co-op Stand and other Matters

Today it was my turn to serve on the Jazz Co-op stand for a couple of hours, an activity which allows you to hear the Concourse music, people watch, chat to all sorts and conditions of men (and women), besides of course drumming up support for the Jazz Co-op gigs. (And folks, remember, you’ll get tax relief if you invest in the Co-op).  Anyway, talking of chatting to women, Joan Parker and I met Marianne, a music student from Tynemouth who is studying in Edinburgh, and we had an in depth discussion about women’s singing and the differences in singing classically, pop music and jazz singing.  This is why I love doing stands, you never know what you’ll get to talk about.

GIJF Day Two: Late Night Jam Session @ The Jazz Café

(Review by Russell/photos courtesy of Mike Tilley)
Gone midnight, exit Sage Gateshead, over the Swing Bridge, wandering through Dante’s Inferno (aka the Quayside/Central Station), heels, legs, swaying revellers, side-stepping a freshly deposited curry (Sunday morning’s pigeons’ breakfast) and on to the Jazz Café. A good night it was with Sue Ferris and Dean Stockdale reported Kay. ‘Hello Mike, is there a good crowd in upstairs?’ ‘Yes, a good few’ the reply. A bottle of Grainger Ale, up the stairs we go.

GIJF Day Two: Beats and Pieces Big Band

(Review by Russell)
Late night, the Jazz Lounge, Beats and Pieces. We’ve been here before. Two or three years ago the lads from Manchester led by Ben Cottrell blew ‘em away. So, here they were, ready to do it again. Standing room only, Beats and Pieces (the Loose Tubes of their iPad generation?) strolled out, casual, carefully groomed beardies in the ranks, a motley crew to look at, musically something else.

GIJF Day Two: On The Concourse

(Observations by Russell/photo courtesy of Ken Drew.)
An integral part of the Gateshead International Jazz Festival at Sage Gateshead is the non stop programme of jazz on the concourse. A social gathering – coffee, cake (some of it is likely to be scoffed as a freebie!), a glass of wine or a beer. The chatter, the snappers, an artist in residence, the place a hive of activity.

Sunday, April 12, 2015

GIJF Day Two: Kevin LeGendre and the Cookers explore Hard Bop

Billy Harper; Eddie Henderson; Jaleel Shaw; David Weiss; George Cables; Cecil McBee; Billy Hart in conversation with Kevin LeGendre.
This was an absolute gem of an afternoon listening to seven living legends - and I'm not using the expression lightly - talking about their careers and their association with Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers. Most, with the probable exception of drummer Billy Hart, had played with the Messengers and all had fascinating stories to tell.

GIJF Day Two - Joshua Redman Trio

Joshua Redman (ten/sop); Reuben Rogers (bs); Greg Hutchinson (dms).
(Review by Lance).
Hall Two was three tiers full begging the question - where are these people the rest of the year? Certainly not at The Globe, Jazz Café, The Bridge or other 'jazz joints' where events are free or minimally priced - strange...
This one extended set by Redman and Co was, for me, a highlight. Tenor playing of the first order. With bass and drums, who didn't need a piano to fill out the rhythm section, the music delighted from the unusual re-working of The Surrey With the Fringe On Top to the final blistering belter the name of which  escapes me (my pen had run out of ink!)

Saturday, April 11, 2015

GIJF Day One: James Birkett & Bradley Johnston

James Birkett (guitar) & Bradley Johnston (guitar)
(Review by Russell/photo courtesy of Ken Drew)
Late night classic jazz guitar. Sage Gateshead’s cavernous concourse is a difficult space to fill at the best of times. For two seated guitarists to hold the attention of those milling around was a tall order. Messrs Birkett and Johnston set about the task. The best thing to do was to play some great jazz guitar and these guys did just that!

GIJF Day One: Stan Tracey’s Under Milk Wood

Bobby Wellins (tenor saxophone), Steve Melling (piano), Andy Cleyndert (double bass), Clark Tracey (drums) & Ben Tracey (narration.)
(Review by Russell/photo courtesy of Ken Drew)
First night of the festival and Hall Two was near, as damn it, full to capacity. No real surprise given that one of the seminal works of British jazz was being revisited by a stellar line-up. Stan Tracey’s Under Milk Wood is fifty. Recorded in 1965, composer Tracey is no longer with us, but the tenor saxophonist on the recording date – Bobby Wellins – continues to perform, his powers undiminished.

GIJF Day One: The Concourse and Other Matters

(Review by Ann Alex/photos courtesy of Ken Drew).
The Jazz Festival began with me committing a criminal act. I chose a lovely chocolate chip muffin from the cafe, was distracted by meeting Russell, and promptly walked away without paying!  So many friends to meet, six in the first ten minutes, and all to the accompaniment of the New York brass band, which included what looked like an impertinent tuba. Not sure if I was entitled to the glass of wine I had at the press reception, so during the first half of Stan Tracy’s Under Milk Wood, I had half an ear listening for police sirens.  The Under Milk Wood music and readings in the second half were totally absorbing and entrancing – see Russell’s review.

GIJF Day One: David Sanborn/Jon Cleary & Jon Scofield/New York Brass Band

David Sanborn (alt); Ricky Peterson (keys); Andrew Berry (bs); Micky Morota (gtr); Chris Coleman (dms); Paolo (perc).
(Review by Lance).
Sanborn is a blower, no mistake about it! If, in the unlikely situation that he went to the aprés festival jam at the Globe, the natives would take to the hills! Although maybe one or two of the local gunslingers would hang around. An amazing technique that allows him to sweep and soar with seemingly effortless ease marks him down as the giant that he is.
Or is he?

Friday, April 10, 2015

Gateshead International Jazz Festival – it’s here! Today's goodies.

(Preview by Russell)
In less than a few hours’ time Sage Gateshead becomes the centre of the jazz universe. Three days of non-stop jazz all under one iconic Norman Foster-designed roof. Sage Gateshead celebrates its tenth anniversary this year (where has the time gone?!). Jazz plays its part throughout the year but the focus is on the long weekend of April 10-12.
Day One – Friday 10 April
Music, workshops, a seminar, food and drink, late night jam sessions – sleep can wait. The music begins on the concourse at 6:30pm on Friday evening with the New York Brass Band. Tynesiders will be familiar with Graham Hardy’s Northern Monkey Brass Band. The New Yorkers are from Yorkshire and they do a similar job – they’ll get you dancing to and from the bar (Two pints of Byker Jazz, please).

CD Review: Lauren Desberg - Twenty First Century Problems

Lauren Desberg (vcl); Walter Smith 111 (ten); Taylor Eigsti (pno); Chris Smith (bs); Corey Fonville (dms); Drew ofthe Drew (sound etc.)
(Review by Lance).
I'll let Ms Desberg tell it from her point of view:
"Jazz was the music of the people from the 20’s-40’s but the sound is so far removed from people today - I wanted to update the music in a way that today’s listener could understand. Jazz for the 21st century, just like an iphone app, everything needs to be updated.
I grew up listening to and loving jazz and popular music. Not gonna lie, my heart belongs to 90’s groups - but my love for them is just as strong as it is for Sarah Vaughan and Anita O’Day."
Hmmm!

Thursday, April 09, 2015

The Dave Weisser Orchestra @ The Chilli. April 8

Dave Weisser (trumpet & vocals), Ray Johnson (trumpet & flugelhorn), Don Forbes (trumpet), Dougie Fielder (tenor saxophone), Rachel Richman (alto saxophone), Tom Lapworth (guitar), Steve Whitfield (keyboards), Barrie Ascroft (bass) & Norman Redhead (drums) + second set Ian Forbes (drums) & Gerry Vega (guitar)
(Review by Russell).
Take it to the Bridge at the Chilli has its nights and this was one of them. Orchestral proportions on the stand, Dave Weisser happily enquired time and again: Okay guys, what’s next? knowing that the guys in the band would come up with something good. Last week’s arctic conditions a distant memory as Heaton’s number one real ale pub basked in late evening spring sunshine, spirits were high and some – no names Peter - were high on spirits.

CD Review: Babelfish - Chasing Rainbows

Brigitte Beraha (vcl); Barry Green (pno); Chris Laurence (bs); Paul Clarvis (perc).
(Review by Lance).
Brigitte Beraha, it would appear, has been round the block a few times - her CV includes commendations from Dame Cleo and the late Sir John, two folk who know/knew a thing or two. John Fordham also gave her the thumbs up 2/3 yearsback. Our dear friend Sebastian Scotney tells me of the high regard Babelfish is held in UK jazz circles and it far beholds me to disagree.
How could I? This is quite a momentous recording!

Wednesday, April 08, 2015

Jazz Café Jam April 7

Peter Gilligan (pno); Bradley Johnston (gtr) Paul Grainger (bs); Paul Wight (dms) + David Gray (tmb); Stuart Finden (ten); Rob Bates (dms); Tom Lapworth (gtr); Francesco Falcioni (pno); Ian Forbes (dms); Don Forbes (tpt); Nick Gould (ten); Yuya Honami (dms); Mary Wrightson (vcl).
(Review by Lance).
Another fine fortnightly (musical) fry up at 'The Caff' - a mixture of Sushi, Haggis, Ravioli, Roast Beef and Stotti Cake served up by some of the best 'cookers' in town. 
Gilligan, Grainger, Johnston and Wight provided the pastry as well as a lot of spice. The not so frequently heard Beatrice (Sam Rivers) served as a starter and set a standard that was maintained yet rarely bettered throughout the evening.

Tuesday, April 07, 2015

CD Review: Daniel Herskedal - Slow Eastbound Train

Daniel Herskedal (tuba/bs tpt); Eyolf Dale (pno); Helge Andreas Norbakken (perc); The Trondheim Soloists (string chamber orchestra).
(Review by Lance)
A Norwegian tuba led quartet with a string chamber music quartet, do I need this?
Truth is I don't!
However, having said that, Herskdal is quite an amazing tuba player who produces a sound as mellow as many a trombone and flugel player. No longer a string bass substitute the instrument here is lyrical to the extent that it's not always easy to define the tracks where he plays the big one and the tracks where he uses the not so big one!

Monday, April 06, 2015

Billie Holiday Centenary Tomorrow

Tomorrow (April 7) marks the centenary of Billie Holiday's birth.  This is marked on Radio 3 by both Alyn Shipton on JRR and Geoffrey Smith's Jazz.
Hugh.

Ralph Sharon (Sept. 17, 1923 - March 31, 2015)

In the most unforgivable oversight possible I missed the death of Ralph Sharon who passed away on March 31 at the grand old age of 91.
Although best remembered as long time accompanist to Tony Bennett, Sharon was an outstanding musician and soloist in his own right.

Tom Harrison Quartet @ The Bridge Hotel Newcastle - Easter Sunday

Tom Harrison (alt); Jamil Sheriff (pno); Simon Read (bs); David Lyttle (dms).
(Review by Lance/photos courtesy of Ken Drew).
It's Derby Day and Newcastle have now lost five in a row - let's drown our sorrows seems to be the prevalent mood as the 27 bus cautiously makes it's way towards the Bridge Hotel expertly avoiding the bodies bestrewn across Grainger St.
Upstairs at the venue it's quieter as the punters have yet to arrive and it takes them awhile to do so. However, we eventually get a quorum and The Tom Harrison Quartet lifts off.

Sunday, April 05, 2015

Katy Trigger/ Alan Law Duo @ Jazz Cafe - Easter Saturday

Katy Trigger (bass guitar, vocals); Alan Law (keys) + Paco Rivera (percussion)
(Review by Ann Alex, Photo Mike Tilley)
Here at BSH we never sleep, not even on bank holidays, so down I went from the Jazz Co-op Workshop to the Jazz Cafe to hear this duo which turned out to be a trio – Paco had come to carry some of the gear, then decided to stay, to play a fine array of hand drums, various shakers, tubular bells and whistles.  It wouldn’t have been the same without him.

New Century Ragtime Orchestra @ St. Augustine's Church Darlington - April 4

(Review by Ray)
Time for our monthly Darlington Jazz trip, today's artistes the 12 strong version of the NCRO - sadly lacking the vocals of Caroline through illness, but with Emma Fisk ably providing the beauty to complement the guys all smartly attired in Dinner Jackets & bow ties.
Having heard the newly released CD "Singing in the Bathtub", which is an excellent buy, we were keen to sample the live version again - NCRO are always hugely entertaining, playing 1920's & 1930's hot dance & swing jazz in authentic arrangements which have your feet tapping away. I'm not aware of any other band that plays in this style, so we are privileged to have them based here in the North East & to be able to enjoy their talents several times a year. 

Colin Dawson w. Levee Ramblers New Orleans Band Springwell Village Hall - April 1

Colin Dawson tpt, Dave Rae  bjo & vcl, Liz Bacon - clt, Paul Bacon - dms, Jim Blenkin - tmb, John Robinson - db bs, Mac Rae – clt/ dms/ vcl.
(Review by Ray Robson)
The Levee Ramblers rose from the ashes of the "Rae Brothers N.O. Band", with virtually the same line up bar Mick Hill or guest trumpeters taking Mac’s original role. The Springwell weekly set has been going some time now, though we have personally only "discovered" it since the sad demise of "Jazz at the Fell".

Saturday, April 04, 2015

Paul Edis @ The Jazz Café. Good Friday

Paul Edis (pno).
(Review by Russell/"Montage" by Mike Tilley.)
Half an hour before the advertised start one hardy soul kept pianist Paul Edis company. Jazz Café staff, twiddling thumbs, said hello. Were hot cross buns a counter attraction? Our monthly appointment with Dr Edis was beginning to look like a select ‘audience with’ affair.
Oh, ye of little faith! Minutes before the nine o’clock start Edis’ many disciples arrived, greeted familiar faces and took a pew. Edis on tap water, his flock on something a little stronger, the Good Friday recital commenced. Montage, My Favourite Things and From Nothing to Nowhere. Three tunes, two of them written by Edis, everyone listening (so, it is possible for some to sit still for more than a millisecond!). Lord of the Dance (from an Appalachian religious community) and Gershwin’s It Ain’t Necessarily So offered piety and Big Apple hedonism in equal measure.

Ruth Lambert/Stuart Collingwood @ Vermont Hotel, Newcastle - April 3

Ruth Lambert (vcl); Stuart Collingwood (pno).
(Review by Lance).
This was a very Good Friday indeed! A solo set by Paul Edis at the Jazz Caff (reviewed by Russell above) put me in the right frame of mind for the short hop across the city centre to the Vermont Hotel. There was a full moon so where else could one celebrate it other than Vermont?
After the intensity  of listening to a solo recital by Paul Edis - don't get me wrong Paul, this is meant as a compliment - I thought the 3 days long piece by Freddy Chopin was fantastic and as one who struggled with the Schaum books I could but gasp in awe! However, once seated in the plush Redwood Bar of the Vermont Hotel listening to Stuart Collingwood comping and soloing with Ruth Lambert how blessed (I use the word blessed as it's Good Friday) I felt to be able to hear such fine, albeit, different, music on a night when the area between the two gigs was awash with - hobbledehoys and ne'er-do-wells. Doubt if Chopin was high on their play list!

Friday, April 03, 2015

Katherine Stone Band @ Ashington Jazz Club - April 1

Katherine Stone (vcl); Paul Gowland (sax); Stuart Collingwood (pno); Paul Grainger (bs); Steve Doyle (dms).
(Review by Peter S.)
We were very pleased to have Katherine and her musicians returning to our stage at the AJC. Our vocalist had recently returned from another musical engagement aboard a Cruise Ship where she is gaining valuable musical experience working with a variety of musicians and developing her career.  We settled down to hear a total of twenty-three popular and lasting lyrics delivered in Katherine’s style and supported by her excellent band. 

LOOSE TUBES INTERVIEW (with Chris Batchelor)

(Our man, Russell, put some questions to Chris Batchelor ahead of the appearance by Loose Tubes at GIJF)
Which Loose Tuber was it who said: Let’s get back together?
Django Bates had been working on the Ronnie Scott’s recordings from 1990, and these came out on the CD “Dancing In Frith Street” . Subsequently Django had some interest from promoters about a reunion and that started the ball rolling.
The Loose Tubes’ line-up at this year’s Gateshead International Jazz Festival is remarkably similar to the early days. Was everyone ‘up for it’ or did some arm-twisting take place?
The reaction was very positive – a few people were no longer in touch, or no longer interested, but the majority were into it and plans began to fall in place. Personally, I was a bit sceptical until it was confirmed that there would be new music. I didn’t want it to be a purely nostalgic event, as the band always had a reputation for fresh ideas and experimentation, so it swung it for me when the BBC commissioned some new music.

Jazz makes its debut at The Bessie Boyd

David Gosling sent me the following info re a new venue Way Out West:
The Bessie Boyd, a new venue in Carlisle, is to launch its first jazz performance on Thursday April 16th.
Situated beneath the St Georges Church, 35 Warwick Road and Earl Street,
The Bessie Boyd is rapidly establishing itself as a great venue for live music and its first jazz show will feature the north east piano and trumpet duo of Paul Edis & Graham Hardy.

CD Review: Paul Riley Quintet - Into View

Paul Riley (alt/sop); Ant Law (gtr); Mitch Jones (pno); Matt Ridley (bs); Dave Hamblett (dms).
(Review by Lance).
Paul Riley, described by Russell van den Berg, as "a sheer joy to listen to, and a sleeping giant" has, until now, been off my radar. 
Not any longer!
A sleeping giant probably is an apt description as this, his debut album, indicates that while he may not - yet - be Goliath he's certainly no midget!
Very much a part of the London scene, Riley is no mere follower of fashion but a lyrical and innovative player producing music that compels you to listen without jarring the senses like some of the current crop of angry young men do.

Thursday, April 02, 2015

Tubb's Biography Ready to Roll


The long awaited publication of Simon Spillett's well researched and eagerly awaited biography of  the late Tubby Hayes -The Long Shadow of the Little Giant  will be available from April 15. Tubbs is considered by many, myself included, to be not only the UK's greatest saxophone player ever, but the greatest UK jazzman irrespective of instrument.

Check out www.equinoxpub.com
This promises to be one very good - and important - jazz read. Hopefully it will tell, or remind, the world as they eulogise over the latest wunderkind, just what an important musician Tubby Hayes was.
Lance.

Good Vibes From Warren

He's pulled off another coup! Warren Thompson Bossman at Hoochie Coochie has booked another class act for his Pilgrim St music venue. The guy who brought Gregory Porter, Chaka Khan and a whole host of other names to Newcastle announced yesterday that tickets are now on sale for jazz/soul vibraphonist ROY AYERS!
The date is Friday July 17 and tickets a mere £22 - get in there now!
Check him out and buy tickets here.
Nice one Warren!
Lance.

Take it to the Bridge @ The Chillingham. April 1

Dave Weisser (trumpet & vocals), Ray Johnson (trumpet & flugelhorn), Roy Stephenson (guitar), Tom Lapworth (guitar), Fardin Esfandiari (guitar), Steve Whitfield (keyboards & vocals), Barrie Ascroft (bass) & Norman Redhead (drums) + second set Don Forbes (trumpet)
(Review by Russell)
The Chilli was never better named. A freezing cold night with the upstairs room heating system broken. The heating engineer wouldn’t come out until the next day – perhaps the cold weather was a deterrent! To make matters worse an air vent steadfastly remained in an open position. Curtains drawn, winter coats on, Dave Weisser and co started on time.

CD Review: Ben Cox Band - This Waiting Game

Ben Cox (vcl); Jamie Safiruddin (keys/md);  Will Glaser (dms/perc); Flo Moore (bs); Adam Chatterton (tpt/flug/bkg vcl); Kirk Elhinney (gtr/bkg vcl); Claire Martin (vcl on Berkeley Square); Emily Dankworth ( vcl on Happy Madness).
As Tony Bennett famously once said, "All of a sudden you had to write your own songs, as if Jerome Kern and Porter weren't good enough anymore."
Not surprisingly, the Beatles' And I love Her and Nightingale Sang are (for me) the outstanding tracks on this CD. The addition of Claire Martin on the latter track lifts it but, with repeated listening, the originals by Salfiruddin come into their own so maybe me and Tony got it wrong - maybe!

Wednesday, April 01, 2015

Schmazz @ the JazzCafé presents Riff Raff – March 31.

Brigitte Beraha (vocals); George Crowley (sax); Rob Updegraff (guitar); Ivo Neame (keyboards, accordion); Dave Manington (bass); Tim Giles (drums)
(Review by Steve H/ Photos courtesy of Ken Drew)
Finally, after attending several fairly non challenging gigs, one to excite the musical taste buds. Any technically gifted jazz musician can knock out SummertimeMy Funny Valentine and even Fog on the Tyne to a standard where audience members can take comfort in recognising familiar territory, enjoying a classic tune whilst appreciating the skilled improvisation. Don’t get me wrong The Great American Song Book has stood the test of time and great songs don’t just roll off the conveyor belt every 50 years or so but too much GAS can lead to a lot of hot air. Personally, nothing beats the excitement of hearing brand new sounds. The tune around the corner may not be as good as the old classic but the element of surprise more than makes up for this.

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About this blog - contact details.

Bebop Spoken Here -- Here, being the north-east of England -- centred in the blues heartland of Newcastle and reaching down to the Tees Delta and looking upwards to the Land of the Kilt.
Not a very original title, I know; not even an accurate one as my taste, whilst centred around the music of Bird and Diz, extends in many directions and I listen to everything from King Oliver to Chick Corea and beyond. Not forgetting the Great American Songbook the contents of which has provided the inspiration for much great jazz and quality popular singing for round about a century.
The idea of this blog is for you to share your thoughts and pass on your comments on discs, gigs, jazz - music in general. If you've been to a gig/concert or heard a CD that knocked you sideways please share your views with us. Tell us about your favourites, your memories, your dislikes.
Lance (Who wishes it to be known that he is not responsible for postings other than his own and that he's not always responsible for them.)
Contact: lanceliddle@gmail.com I look forward to hearing from you.

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